Part 3 of What a Go-To Does Differently: Obsession

This is the third installment of a multi-part series to talk about what a Go-To does differently from the me-too pack. Part 1 talked about how a Go-To focuses.  Part 2 talked about the importance of establishing a beachhead. Next up: The importance of obsessing over what you do.

A Go-To is Obsessed with Its Area of Expertise

I used to have an old Mercedes diesel sedan and would take it to the San Francisco Go-To for these cars, Fred, at Silver Star Motor Services. Fred didn’t just work on old Mercedes diesels. He loved them. He was an aficionado. He was constantly thinking about them, reading about them, learning more about them. And he had strong opinions about them. He could bend your ear for hours talking about the ins and outs of these cars. He wasn’t showing off, he was waxing poetic about something he was passionate about. He would just light up at the thought of these cars. It wasn’t a business or job for him – it was his life.

A Go-To doesn’t just specialize. A Go-To is a passionate aficionado, a devotee. A Go-To obsesses. And a Go-To is very opinionated when it comes to a particular market issue.

steve-jobs-iphoneSteve Jobs was obsessed with distinctive design. He insisted that Apple’s mantra be simplicity. In his mind, consumer technology was too complex, hard to use, and ugly. As a result, the company has always been obsessed with creating innovative, easy-to-use technology that people have an emotional connection with. When Apple started to work on the iPhone, Steve Jobs didn’t instruct the development team to create a device that would put a computer in your pocket. His directive was: “Create the first phone that people [will] fall in love with.” According to Former Apple product manager, Bob Brochers, “The idea was, he wanted to create something that was so instrumental and integrated in peoples’ lives that you’d rather leave your wallet at home than your iPhone.” Steve Jobs was clearly passionate, obsessive and strongly opinionated about how people should interact with technology, and these qualities have informed everything Apple has created, even after his passing.

800wi-jpgWhen Marc Benioff founded Salesforce.com in 1999, he was absolutely passionate about the need for companies to move away from installed software and to adopt the software-as-a-service (SaaS or “cloud”) model. I saw him on stage at a conference in 2006, and he relentlessly and completely unapologetically pounded on his primary thesis that installed enterprise software was on its way to extinction. At the time, it was still an emerging idea, but Salesforce.com was so passionate about the idea that it put a “stamp” of the word “software” in a red circle with a slash through it on every ad, on its website and any other bit of material associated with the company. Benioff wore a trademark pin of the image everywhere he went, including on the stage that day. It is difficult to find an article or presentation by him that does not espouse his point of view on this topic.

I’m obsessed with the importance of companies becoming the Go-To in their markets. What are you obsessed with?