Part 4 of What a Go-To Does Differently: Ownership

This is the fourth installment of a multi-part series to talk about what a Go-To does differently from the me-too pack.

Now we’ll talk about a Go-To’s purpose in life.

A Go-To Has a Higher Purpose: It Takes Market Ownership of a Problem

A Go-To says, “I’ll take this one. I’ll own this problem.”  A Go-To fixates on a market problem (or opportunity) and declares intellectual ownership for that problem or opportunity, effectivelthinkstockphotos-485715206y becoming the ringleader, the primary thought leader, for related discussions and market activity.

Cisco doesn’t talk endlessly about sensors and routers, it talks endlessly about how the “Internet of Everthing” will save lives or reduce risk for companies. GE has taken intellectual ownership for the “Industrial Internet of Things.”

Kaiser Permanente, the large health maintenance organization (HMO), doesn’t just offer an integrated delivery system – where you and your family can get all of your health care in one place, with a single set of medical records and a  multi-disciplinary team devoted to your well being  – it believes this model is the way of the future. Kaiser has been running its “Thrive” campaign for over ten years, offering tips for healthy living.  Many of its ads don’t talk about Kaiser at all. Screen Shot 2017-02-11 at 5.57.10 PM.pngThey address Kaiser’s higher purpose. One print ad shows an image of a jump rope curled into the shape of a human brain, with the copy, “Exercise doesn’t just make you feel better, offering a good defense against depression and anxiety. It helps you stay more alert and focused. Something you can think clearly about as you knock out just one last set. To learn more go to kp.org/thrive.”

According to Kaiser’s Diane Gage Lofgren, senior vice president, brand strategy, communications and public relations, and Debbie Cantu, the company’s vice president, brand marketing and advertising, Kaiser wants to play the role of  health advocate “completely dedicated to health and well-being with the fact that, no matter what their stages of life, people want to be as healthy as they can be.”

Salesforce.com was founded to solve the problem of expensive enterprise software implementations, with an initial focus on the salesforce. Facebook’s goal is to connect everyone on the planet. Apple created iTunes to make it easy for iPod users to legally download songs vs. illegal options that were rampant at the time. Cybersecurity firm, RSA, is regarded as one of the most trusted brands in its space and, as a demonstration of its “ownership of the problem,” hosts the world’s largest and most respected annual information security conference.

So it’s not just about solving a market problem. It’s also about keeping the conversation alive and working with the market to make continuing, collective progress against the problem.

What problem do you or will you own?

Part 2 of What a Go-To Does Differently: Beachhead

This is the next installment of a multi-part series to talk about what a Go-To does differently from the me-too pack. Part 1 talked about how a Go-To focuses. The next thing a Go-To does differently is build from a base of strength.

A Go-To Builds a Strong Beachhead Around a Central Theme Before It Broadens

Rather than a hodge podge of messages, products, services and activities, a Go-To builds its brand around a central theme/market, and every fiber of its being revolves around that theme until the company has enough of a dominant position to broaden from there into adjacent markets. Its activities aren’t all over the map. They are highly, highly focused.

  • Oracle gained its footing as the Go-To for relational database technology before broadening into applications a full ten years after it was founded.
  • Salesforce.com built its foundation as a salesforce automation application before broadening into other sales and marketing applications.
  • Accenture is a $30 billion company today but started in the early 1950s as a tiny consulting division of the accounting firm, Arthur Andersen, to meet audit client demand for financial and manufacturing process automation. The bulk of this division’s business was focused on these two areas well into the 1970s.
  • Facebook was initially only available to Harvard students; once strong there, it allowed students from just eight other universities to join. Not until it had a firm foothold in those markets, with others asking to join, did it open itself to most universities and corporations before finally allowing anyone 13 and older to sign up. Even with Facebook’s lightning-speed growth trajectory, this progression took two and a half years.

Look around. Just about any large company you can think of started with a beachhead.

51susyutxjl-_sx330_bo1204203200_Geoffrey Moore discusses the importance of a beachhead in market dominance strategy in his seminal strategic marketing book, Crossing the Chasm, which I highly recommend as a marketing primer to newbies and as a great refresher to everyone else. Using a D-Day analogy, he explains the importance of focusing your scant resources to secure a stronghold and then building from a base of strength. Much of what he talks about are principles many MBA students learned but have proceeded to ignore at their peril. It’s truly excellent and is a quick read well worth your time. Buy your own physical copy, mark it up and keep it near your desk for frequent reference.

One of the metaphors he references in explaining market dominance strategy is the use of kindling to start a fire.

The bunched-up paper represents your promotional budget, and the log, a major market opportunity. No matter how much paper you put under that log, if you don’t have any target market segments to act as kindling, sooner or later, the paper will be all used up, and the log still won’t be burning…this isn’t rocket science, but it does represent a kind of discipline.

— Geoffrey Moore

The key, then, is to figure out a beachhead – which market will you seek to own first before broadening?